Morrisons invests in its staff – but in the right way?

Savvy retailers will already know just how important its staff are to their success. As the faces to their name, it’s essential that the happiness of the workforce is prioritised.

Morrisons is certainly attempting to do this with its latest move, which will see the supermarket chain invest a huge £30 million into facilities for its staff. Not only will this include a décor revamp, but employees will be treated to perks like subsidised coffee.

However, the change that is likely to result in the most enthusiasm from its workers is to wages. Employee benefits and pay is a hot topic right now, as retailers prepare the implement the new National Living Wage in April. And Morrisons is staying ahead of the curve on this one, promising its 90,000 staff a 20% pay rise to £8.20 an hour, more than the expected £7.20.

This is sure to boost staff morale– much needed considering Morrisons has been suffering falling sales for quite some time now. But are the changes actually going to help staff do their jobs any better?

Being the ones who work in the stores every day, store associates are the only ones who can really know what needs improving. Yet, they’re often the ones who retailers listen to the least. For example, new research from Miura Systems claims that UK retail businesses are losing millions of pounds in sales by not listening to staff who’ve spotted a vital need to improve store technology.

Today’s shopper is tech-reliant, so it’s no surprise that this is a major factor in how they rate a store experience. Whether it be a speedy checkout service, or the ability to browse the web as they navigate the shop, consumers expect technology to run seamlessly – and it’s often the staff they’ll blame if it doesn’t.

So, even with a free cup of coffee in hand, it’s unlikely that Morrisons staff will feel very motivated if shop floor processes aren’t optimised.

Miura also revealed that 72% of retail employees think customers are more demanding than ever before, even asking them questions when they’re serving others. With this mind, retailers should be doing all they can to help employees in high-pressure situations. Arming them with tablets so they can check product information and stock availability quickly, perhaps, or placing interactive kiosks in-store to allow shoppers to serve themselves easily when a staff member is unavailable.

A further 80% of retail staff said shoppers put pressure on them to hurry when there is a queue. In busy trading periods this can’t always be avoided, but it can certainly be improved. A speedy payment process is absolutely essential here; as the final stage in their journey, this is the memory most shoppers will take away when they leave. Therefore, retailers must in the most cutting-edge payments technology to keep queues flowing – such as contactless and mobile.

Of course, this is no discredit to what businesses like Morrisons are doing. Rewarding staff with treats is a great way to show appreciation for all their hard work, and happy store associates tend to be more productive. However, this work will do little good to the performance of their business if they’re not armed with the right tools to keep customers happy too.

3 sectors that can’t survive without contactless

Contactless has become the unstoppable force of the payments industry. From a relatively niche transaction method less than two years ago, its popularity has soared among consumers, with contactless spending increasing by 330% during 2014.

Although this change in consumer behaviour impacts businesses across the board, there are certain industries where contactless payments are proving critical to success. Here, we outline the opportunities in three of those sectors – and why it’s paramount that companies in these areas embrace the latest payments technology.

  1. Retail

It’s official: contactless is the new cash – it’s even driving down ATM traffic. ‘Touch and go’ style card transactions are the fastest growing payment method. According to recent Halifax statistics, contactless now accounts for £15 of every £100 spent, and have contributed to a 16.6% fall in cash withdrawals.

What does this mean for retailers? Put simply, today’s shoppers want to use their card for both low and high value purchases. With companies including Boots, Marks & Spencer, Sainsbury’s and WH Smith already proactively using contactless payments services, the technology is quickly moving from a differentiator to a necessity.

The need to offer contactless payments will increase over the next few months as well; from January 2016 all new POS terminals that accept MasterCard will be required to have contactless capabilities.

  1. Travel

Of all the sectors, travel has been most progressive in its use of contactless payments. Almost half of contactless payments take place within the M25, predominantly due to its adoption across the London transport network.

Since switching from Oyster to contactless, Transport for London has reached more than one million taps a day, becoming the fastest growing contactless merchant in Europe.

With one of the country’s largest transport networks leading the way, it is only a matter of time before customers demand to use contactless payments whenever they commute. This will, however, enable travel companies to address challenges such as passengers attempting to board with pre-pay cards that are out of credit.

  1. Hospitality

An important change takes place this September, which will catapult contactless to the front of the hospitality agenda: the maximum transaction value will increase to £30.

While contactless is already being used by some pubs and cafes to cover low value orders, raising the limit on payment levels will place new vendors – such as restaurants – in the ‘sweet spot’ for tap to pay technology.

Contactless will also become a crucial queue buster during busy periods. McDonalds and Starbucks are among those already using payment solutions to improve customer convenience, and even those outside the traditional hospitality environment, like market stalls and mobile food vans, will need contactless card payments to keep up with consumer demands.

Enjoyed this article? Check out our surprising stats about contactless payments for more insights.

What’s the real reason card payment usage in the UK continues to grow?

The UK Cards Association has this week announced that consumer card spending surpassed £0.5 trillion for the first time in 2013. According to the report, nearly 75% of all retail spending is now through credit and debit cards in the UK, a big increase in comparison to ten years ago, when it lingered below the 50% mark. This has left us questioning, why?

Electronic payment methods have been around long enough now, that people of all demographics have felt comfortable using them for some while – so this is a doubtful cause for the constant increase, although it may be a contributing factor.

Some may blame consumers’ growing reliance on credit cards, however there has actually been a 16% fall in outstanding borrowing on credit cards since its peak in 2005, as the economy finally seems to have made a turn in the right direction. If anything, this would impact negatively on card payment figures.

In-store payment innovations such as contactless and MPoS give consumers a more exciting format to use and they may be encouraged to pay this way than through traditional methods. The ease of both payment types offer customers more convenience and speed – two things that consumers are increasingly craving.

Hand-in-hand with an increase in card payments is the growth of e-commerce – if you want to shop online, you simply have to pay electronically or you can’t make an order. With the growing spectrum of delivery and collection options being made available, paying online is sometimes the best option for time-pressed consumers.

The world is becoming ever more electronic in all aspects of life and consumers want the convenience and ease of paying by card. For large establishments, this can sometimes pose a problems with updating systems and connectivity on a large scale, but ensuring all parts of a business are networked in together streamlines the process and will inevitably impact on a company’s bottom line.