Are fashion e-tailer’s attempts to venture offline Missguided?

It’s a great time for online retail. Hailed as the most convenient means of shopping, ecommerce is in the midst of one of its most successful seasons yet – December alone saw a sales increase by 15.1% compared to the previous year.

However, it seems that this level of success isn’t quite enough for some retailers; in a bid to grow even further, they’re looking offline too. Fashion e-tailer Missguided recently announced plans to open its first store in the UK, and it’s not the only one – the likes of Boohoo and Fabletics have also taken their first steps into bricks-and-mortar.

And who can blame them? News headlines about the death of the high street are fast becoming replaced with success stories. Services such as click-and-collect are providing stores with a new lease of life, with John Lewis being the latest retailer to praise the shopping method’s contribution to its strong festive trading figures. Meanwhile, some are even calling out for store opening hours to be extended, with 64% of retail workers in London supporting longer trading on Sundays.

So yes, heading to the High Street offers great potential for an online retailer. But there some things to factor in if they wish to replicate the great customer experience they create on the web.

Unlike ecommerce, the store has a helping hand in converting sales: staff. Personal service is something that gives bricks-and-mortar an edge over online shopping, so it’s essential that retailers make the most of this opportunity.

Offering great bricks-and-mortar customer service relies on the retailer’s ability to give consumers the same informative experience as their digital platforms provide. Yet, we recently found that 43% of shoppers voiced frustrations with inconsistent answers from staff. In order to address these communication challenges in-store, some leading retailers are equipping staff with tablets. This way they’ll have access to product information and stock availability at the swipe of a finger, making it far more likely that they can address customer queries.

This is especially important at a time when most shoppers enter the store with some level of product knowledge. Recent research from omnichannel retail specialist iVend Retail revealed that 68% of European consumers will research online before visiting a store – and clued up customers expect far more from retailers. These shoppers have already done their research, and just want to touch or try the item before committing to a purchase. In this case, staff members are far more likely to be faced with technical queries regarding the item, rather than general product information. In this case, a tablet device will prove even more valuable to your staff – they can’t be expected to understand the ins and outs of every store product on their own after all.

And not all shoppers restrict their online research to the comfort of their own homes. Instead, many are relying on their mobile devices to have a quick browse in-store, either for more product knowledge or to compare it with those available from other retailers. During the festive period alone, 41% of shoppers ‘showroomed’ when buying gifts in-store.

This shopper desire to use mobile in-store, combined with staff usage of tablets, means more devices devices than ever are connecting to store networks. Retailers that have not invested well enough in their network may be faced with a whole host of issues; slow running technology, intermittent connections and, in the worst case, complete connectivity blackouts. Not only will this be extremely frustrating to those working at the business, but most importantly, customers will be left disappointed too. Then, all the good work that retailers have done to blend their store and online experiences will be completely undone.

The battle for consistency between online and bricks-and-mortar shopping has been raging for years, and retailers like Missguided must tread carefully to ensure their in-person experience lives up to the digital hype. Much attention will have been paid to the marketing, store layout and such like, but it’s the network underpinning their store that will define their ability to deliver what customers want.

 

 

 

4 stores that are ripping up the rule book of bricks-and-mortar retail

Consumer patience with outdated stores is fading.  As discussed in our previous blog – make better communication your store’s New Year’s resolution – 43% of shoppers have voiced their frustrations with in-store service, and it’s fair to say that now’s the time to invest in new ways to impress and delight.

Of course, there are some retailers that are already staying ahead of the curve, innovating their traditional store formats to reinvent what physical retail means to shoppers. The future of the store relies on its ability to wow the customer every time they visit – here we list four stores that enhanced their experience to do just that:

McDonalds – build your own burger

There are countless fast-food outlets out there; couple this with the expectation of speedy service, and you’re in an environment where it’s especially tricky to stand out. However, McDonald’s has found a way to tick both of these boxes with its latest piece of technology.

The fast-food giant has added a ‘build your own burger’ kiosk to one of its New York restaurants, allowing diners to choose from dozens of ingredient combinations to create their ideal order. Founded with an easy-to-serve menu, it was certainly a risky move for the retailer, yet one that answered their customers’ cry for variety.

Cranleigh Bridal – virtual bridal party

Back here in the UK, a bridal shop in Surrey has found its own way to offer a unique experience to customers. Cranleigh Bridal is the first store in Britain to be fitted with a mirror that has integrated Skype capabilities, enabling brides to call friends and family to show them their dress choice. This really plays to the emotional investment in planning a wedding, significantly enhancing customer satisfaction.

House of Fraser – scan the glass

Black Friday is now an integral part of the UK’s retail calendar, and shoppers are taking notice. In 2015, House of Fraser used the event to pilot a new way to entice passers by.

The department store created shoppable windows, integrated with augmented reality technology in its flagship London store. Consumers passing the store were able to use the House of Fraser app to scan the glass for a full list of Black Friday deals, reserve items and pick them up from a collection point. It was a launch that was perfectly timed, appealing to busy festive shoppers when the queues were likely at their longest.

Tommy Hilfiger – straight from the runway

New York Fashion Week is a designers’ chance to showcase their latest creations to the world. A lot of time and budget is spent to ensure that the runway show not only highlights the clothes in the best way, but is a memorable performance. But while it’s easy for those in the audience to be blown away, what about the brand’s wider customer base?

Tommy Hilfiger has managed to include brand fans in its Fashion Week experience, with the help of virtual reality. Some its stores are kitted with Samsung GearVR headsets, allowing shoppers to watch a 360-degrees 3D version of the runway show, as if they were sat in the front row. This way, the iconic catwalk is brought to life instead of relying on press images to do the talking.

Have you seen any innovative stores of the future? Share your stories and images with us @Vodat_Int.

Make better communication your store’s New Year’s resolution

There’s no doubt that online retail has had its fair share of flattering headlines this year. Hailed as the speediest, most convenient way to shop, it’s getting harder for bricks-and-mortar to compete.

However, there is something that the store can triumph in – and that’s personal service. While it may be easy to drop a few products into an online basket, the advice and expertise of knowledgeable in-store staff is something that can’t be matched.

Yet, it seems that 2015 may not have been the store’s finest hour. Our own research showed that there’s still much work to do to perfect the in-store experience:

  • 37% of shoppers hate receiving inconsistent answers from staff
  • 30% of consumers have abandoned a purchase because staff couldn’t answer their question
  • 5 minutes is the maximum time customers will wait for a query to be answered before leaving the store

That leaves retailers with a very short window of time to wow the shopper. If they don’t do just that, they risk losing a once loyal customer – one who will no doubt share their negative experience with family and friends.

However, with a New Year comes a new chance to change bad habits. So why not make 2016 the year to perfect your in-store service? It all starts with giving your staff the tools to succeed:

Invest in training

60% of customers believe knowledgeable staff deliver better customer service. Yet, with changing layouts, new products and time-sensitive offers to contend with, it’s no wonder that your workforce may be left confused. Communication is key here; ensure each member of staff is briefed at the start of their shift, alerting them to anything that may have changed since they were last there.

Implement tablets

21% of shoppers want sales associates to be given point of sale technology. And, it’s a request that will make life a lot easier for your staff. Allowing them to walk the floor with a tablet in hand, ensures they will always be ready for that tricky customer question. They’ll be able to check things such as product information and stock availability at the touch of a button, before finalising the purchase with a speedy payment.

Empower customers

22% of consumers would like to see more digital information points in store. There are a number of reasons why your staff might be unavailable for customer queries – whether the queue is too long or they’re locating an order, for example. The point is, sometimes a shortage of sales associates to give a helping hand is out of your control. Therefore, it’s important to ensure that shoppers can help themselves if need be. In-store kiosks are idea, as it presents shoppers with an alternative information source when a staff member isn’t free.

Competing with the fast-growing world of ecommerce is no easy job for stores, certainly if they don’t have the right toolkit to support them. And, of course, implementing the above suggestions will help get 2016 off to a promising start – but without a reliable WiFi connection, your New Year’s resolution for a better store experience will soon be broken.

For more information about successful in-store communication, read our report – ‘Why retailers and customers are becoming disconnected by the store network.’

15 stories that defined retail in 2015

It hardly seems like five minutes since the January sales were underway, yet already we’ve reached the end of the year – and what a year it’s been!

Following on from our 6 stories that redefined retail in the first six months of 2015, here are 15 unpredictable tales that have shaken the industry across the entire year.

In no particular order…

  1. House of Fraser undergoes a customer-centric restructure

It’s already been predicted that 2016 will be the year in which omnichannel evolution results in infrastructural change, and House of Fraser is leading the way. In July, the department store chain announced a customer-centric revamp of its business model, in which its CRM, product and multichannel functions work together around shopper needs.

  1. Amazon goes Prime-tastic in the UK

If Black Friday and Cyber Monday weren’t enough, Amazon launched its own flash sale – Prime Day – in the summer. The inaugural event was hailed a global success, generating a 93% increase in Year-on-Year sales.

Read our blog: Amazon’s Prime Day highlights the gap between online and in-store promotions

  1. Argos ups its delivery game

Fulfilment has been a hotly contest battleground throughout 2015, and Argos put its stake in the ground during October with the launch of a UK same day delivery service, 7 days a week.

This went hand-in-hand with a reinvigorated click-and-collect offering, promising in store collection in less than 60 seconds.

  1. Marks & Spencer puts the Spark back into its loyalty scheme

It’s been a turbulent couple of years for Marks & Spencer, but its revamped loyalty scheme – released in October – may engender greater customer advocacy, by incentivising shoppers for non-transactional activities.

Read our blog: Has Marks & Spencer sparked a smarter way to increase loyalty?

  1. Littlewoods waves goodbye to its catalogue

For many consumers, the Littlewoods catalogue has been a retail institution throughout their lives. However, after 80 years – and earlier promises that it would remain a trading channel – the retailer decided to scrap its catalogue and focus on its online offering.

  1. HMV rises from the ashes

If you’d been asked two years ago to predict which retailer would be the biggest physical retailer of music in the UK in 2015, the administration-bound HMV would have been a rank outsider.

However, a renewed customer-focus strategy, better processes for dealing with peak trading promotions than its rivals, and a resurgence in the appeal of vinyl have all contributed to HMV’s fortunes flourishing once more.

  1. Lush inhales the sweet smell of success

Cosmetics brand Lush deposed insurance firm First Direct as the UK’s best brand for customer experience in 2015, according to KPMG Nunwood rankings. KMPG remarked that the brand’s imparting of product knowledge has been essential to its success, with several other top 10 retailers combining content and commerce to enhance the customer experience.

  1. Wet weather dampens summer sales

The UK experienced its worst retail sales since November 2008 in August this year, with unseasonably damp weather contributing to poor performance on the high street. Online sales did increase during the summer, but at some of the slowest rates on record.

  1. John Lewis starts charging for click-and-collect

Given that most of the retail industry is incentivising customers to collect in store with a free despatch service, an eyebrow or two was raised when John Lewis decided to start charging for click-and-collect orders under £30.

The retailer reasoned that fewer than 1 in 5 shoppers currently make click-and-collect purchases under £30, and it needs a more sustainable model for managing store-based fulfilment costs.

  1. River Island lets customers click and not collect

Continuing the click-and-collect theme, River Island evolved its offering in a different direction during November, pioneering a ‘click and don’t collect’ theme in partnership with Shutl.

The service uses Shutl’s on demand delivery platform to re-route in-store collection orders for home delivery, in order to give customers greater control over their last mile experience.

  1. John Lewis breaks the internet…but Sainsbury’s wins the Christmas ad war

When John Lewis released its Man on the Moon festive advert in November it was viewed so many times that YouTube’s counter froze for several hours. However, the department store chain was trumped by Sainsbury’s, which was voted best Christmas ad by Opinium Research for its tale of Mog the Cat.

  1. Black Friday falls flat on the High Street

The scrums in the aisles that were synonymous with Black Friday 2014 were not repeated this year, as the post-thanksgiving promotion was heavily weighted online. Retail footfall in stores and shopping centres was down 4.05% on Black Friday itself, while ecommerce saw a huge spike in activity that continued right through to Cyber Monday.

  1. The Kurt Geiger shoe fits another foot

They say a change is as good as rest, but when Kurt Geiger was acquired by private equity group Cinven in December, it marked the shoe designer’s third owner in just four years.

Cinven acquired Kurt Geiger for £245million. The company is known for longer-term investments – five years or more – so this could be the start of a new, consistent chapter for the brand.

  1. Customers get cross about connectivity

Poor in-store communications were revealed as a significant cost to customer relationships in a Vodat study published in August. Our survey found that a third of consumers have abandoned a purchase because they couldn’t get the information they needed prior to purchase, while 4 in 10 have left a store and sought the item elsewhere.

Download our report: why retailers and customers are becoming disconnected by the store network

  1. Despite tribulations, retailers end 2015 cautiously confident

It’s not been an easy journey for the retail industry over the past 12 months, but many are hopeful of a strong showing in 2016.

Improving economic sentiment and steady Christmas sales point to positive growth in the New Year, with major cultural events such as the Rio Olympic Games and European Football Championships set to keep shoppers happy – and spending – into the summer months.

 

5 ecommerce websites to watch on Black Friday

Retailers with a transactional website are about to face their biggest test of the year: Black Friday, which takes place on November 27th. Spending is predicted to reach £1.9 billion – a 17% increase on last year – in the UK, with a third of sales taking place online, according to Visa Europe.

Already we’ve seen one casualty of a surge in online trading, as Argos’ website tripped over when it launched its ’12 days of Black Friday’ promotion. However, the good news for the brand is that it has a few days to learn lessons and put contingency plans in place before ecommerce activity peaks.

For other businesses, though, the litmus test is yet to come – so what should we expect from the digital retail community on the big day?

It’s definitely worth keeping an eye on Amazon, ASOS, Debenhams, Marks & Spencer and Next this Black Friday. A recent study by Aimia crowned these retailers the best five UK ecommerce sites for customer experience.

The survey identified personalisation as pivotal to the online journey, as although these sites are rising to the challenge, more than half of consumers feel they are still being targeted with irrelevant product suggestions.

However, tailoring promotions based on previous buying behaviour is the tip of the ecommerce iceberg – some retailers are still struggling to get their basic offering right, particularly under pressure.

During peak trading events like Black Friday, the number one priority is being present and capable of delivering on customer expectations, and the resources needed to achieve this should not be underestimated. As Schuh’s head of ecommerce, Sean McKee, remarked in a recent Black Friday video interview, “be available for the customer, because the customer is absolutely wanting to buy products from you”.

Too many retailers experienced issues with their website last Black Friday, resulting in slow loading times, long waits and costly periods of downtime. In order to avoid this in 2015, concerned businesses need to ask themselves the following questions:

  • Is your hosting environment flexible enough to accommodate surges in demand?
  • Do you need to increase your server capacity to cope with Black Friday traffic?
  • Does your hosting company know it is Black Friday, and what the impact could be on digital activity?
  • Have you got the infrastructure in place to monitor Black Friday traffic in real-time, and respond to emerging issues?

At the end of the day, come Black Friday, price trumps everything else. So while personalisation might be the long game, on 27th November ecommerce retailers need to focus on availability and efficiency to maximise market share.

The #manonthemoon isn’t just a test for John Lewis’ ad team

When does the festive season begin? For retailers it was months ago, but for much of the public, the Christmas klaxon has been sounded in recent years by the debut of John Lewis’ Christmas advert.

This year is no exception, with the launch of its #manonthemoon commercial, a poignant piece highlighting the loneliness and isolation that this time of year can be filled with for many (John Lewis has partnered with Age UK for the campaign).

I’ll leave any critiques of the advert to the marketing experts; what I want to focus on are the consequences of yet another hugely successful initiative for John Lewis.

Ultimately, however they tell the story, retailers release big budget ads because they want to sell more in the run-up to Christmas. All being well, they should see a fairly swift uplift in online traffic, which will filter through to the store as well.

The challenge for these businesses is to make sure the beautifully crafted brand image showcased in their Yuletide commercials is upheld when customers reach the shelf edge – otherwise their overriding emotion is going to turn from awe to disappointment.

Christmas shopping is a stressful activity at the best of times, let alone when shoppers can’t get the item they’re looking for, they’re forced to queue for a long period of time, or they struggle to get questions answered by overstretched members of staff.

Now, I’m not saying John Lewis is guilty of any of the above, but generally speaking, customer experience in the store is an ongoing challenge for the retail industry. In our recent report: why retailers and customers are becoming disconnected by the store network – and how to fix it,  we discovered that almost half of shoppers have experienced frustrations trying to get queries solved in-store, and looked into the significant impact this has on long-term relationships.

What makes depth of service even more critical at Christmas is the fact that many consumers aren’t buying for themselves this time of year. As a result, they’re far more likely to be asking questions about the products they potentially want to buy.

Christmas isn’t a particularly loyal time of year – events such as Black Friday and Cyber Monday encourage people to shop around for the best price – but a good store experience can make a retailer stand out from the crowd, and inspire a newfound advocacy into the New Year.

Equally, a worse-than-expected encounter can dampen the reputation that marketing departments and agencies have spent thousands (in some cases, millions) of pounds creating.

With click-and-collect purchases expected to soar to record levels this festive season, store associates are going to be under enormous pressure to serve time-poor customers in a satisfactory and timely manner.

So as the nation passes its verdict on Christmas ad season, let’s hope the retailers putting out these yuletide offerings have the network infrastructure to follow through on the brand promise their stories portray.

 

Has Marks & Spencer sparked a smarter way to increase loyalty?

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you’ll know that Marks & Spencer has just unveiled its new loyalty scheme, Sparks, to rapturous applause across the retail industry.

Hailed as ‘groundbreaking’ by the retailer, Sparks differentiates itself from traditional applications by rewarding both purchases and non-transactional activities, such as product reviews.

Accumulating large volumes of points will open up access to money-can’t-buy experiences, such as exclusive events and collection previews – which Marks & Spencer believes will foster a two-way relationship with their most loyal customers, tailoring the brand experience.

The retail industry has been quick to praise this new approach to customer retention, and not without reason. Our discount-driven culture has devalued promotional and price based loyalty; consumers now expect a good deal as standard. In fact, many are tired of having to make a purchase altogether to pledge their allegiance.

Instead, loyal customers are building a new role for themselves, in which their brand advocacy becomes part of the retailer’s marketing strategy. Today’s consumers don’t just feel satisfied when they’ve had a good experience – they blog about it, tweet about it, Instagram their new purchase, review the experience online, and so forth (something we discussed in our recent report about how social media can make or break customer relationships).

Smart retailers realise this and are finding ways to reward it.

However, Marks & Spencer isn’t the first. This type of non-transactional incentivisation is already being pushed hard in the hospitality industry. Starbucks, for example, has experienced tremendous success with its mobile app, which gives users custom offers, early access to new products, even enables them to pay at the same time as collecting points.

Even other retailers have forged ahead with experiential offerings for its most loyal customers. Harvey Nichols springs to mind here – the premium department store has made its entire programme mobile-based, using an app to fast track high value customers through to exclusive events and personalised privileges.

What’s seminal about Marks & Spencer’s Sparks, though, is its sphere of influence.

Regardless of the ups and downs it has weathered in recent years, M&S is a stalwart British brand, reflecting British people. Families have shopped there for generations, and trust the retailer to deliver to a certain level of quality. Therefore if Marks & Spencer are offering it, they’ll start expecting other household names to follow suit.

The battle isn’t won yet for M&S, though. Now it needs to integrate Sparks within its offering, to recognise true customer value across all channels. This is easy to do online, but it’s harder work in the store – and customers cannot feel they are being treated as a second class citizen when they choose the bricks-and-mortar route to purchase.

So in conclusion, Marks & Spencer’s loyalty scheme has the potential to ripple across the High Street, redefining how retailers value and reward their customers. But it will only truly hit the nail on the head if it’s part of a joined up omnichannel experience.

Argos’ Fast Track delivery is a real traffic driver – if it works in-store

An eyebrow or two was likely raised in the retail industry this week, when Argos announced its new Fast Track delivery service – same-day service any day of the week, provided the order is placed before 10pm.

While it might seem like a reaction to the UK launch of Amazon Prime Now to some, it makes a lot of sense. We’re about to hit the busiest trading period of the year, so taking its delivery services in-house gives Argos the opportunity to scale up workforce and logistics to cope with spikes in activity, such as Black Friday.

And as a multichannel retailer, naturally Argos is also rolling out the service into stores, offering free delivery to the customer’s local outlet – as opposed to the £3.95 charge for home delivery. Again, this is logical, as the cost to fulfil into store is going to be lower than home delivery (if the product isn’t sitting there already), and it takes some of the pressure off fulfilment networks.

Argos’ big money promise for store collectors is that they can collect the item within 60-seconds of being served, as the retailer’s stock management is able show estate-wide location and availability of products.

60 seconds is a big gauntlet to throw down – especially when you consider we’re about to career into the Christmas trading period. Its investment may give Argos greater control over fulfilment of Black Friday orders, but we can see the ‘quick click-and-collect’ promise really catching on as we move through December, and this could cause serious headaches.

Although Argos is taking on 1,000 extra staff for the Christmas period, those personnel are going to need to get up to speed quickly to cope with a potentially even bigger than usual late rush.

Its retail park locations and extended opening hours are a natural magnet for consumers fitting their festive shopping around a busy schedule, especially if they can secure speedy service at no extra charge.

But what seems to the customer like a simple act of picking something up, is reliant on a well-oiled machine at the back end. Argos has the inventory visibility, but it needs to perfect the chain of events between order and collection to deliver on time – and to expectation – in the store environment.

Argos will also need to upskill these temporary staff very quickly on how to work the technology required to complete transactions – and of course they will need a robust network to cope with the increase in order volumes. Customers are going to be twice as grumpy if they have to wait due to technical problems AND they are in a hurry.

As we mentioned in a blog post earlier this year, Argos is doing some really savvy things around technology, which reinforces its credentials as a cutting-edge, customer focused retailer. During this highly pressured trading period, let’s hope its new scheme is optimised for the tidal wave of store pick-ups as well as home deliveries.

Is retail ready for the mobile-obsessed shopper’s rise to power?

123: that’s the number of times the average 17-25 year-old checks their iPhone every single day. To put this into context, that’s 30 times more than 26-35 year-olds, and a whopping 86 times more than those aged 55+, according to the latest Kantar data.

This information is not surprising – we all know the younger generations are glued to their phones most of the time – but it does beg the question as to whether retailers are listening to such statistics?

Right now, it doesn’t matter too much on the whole, because older shoppers are those with the greatest disposable income. Last year, the average 30-49 year-old could enjoy up to £1,400 to spend on goods and services each month, compared to around £100 for the 18-30s.

However, today’s tech-obsessed shoppers are tomorrow’s young professionals, and today’s young professionals are tomorrow’s high flyers. And when their disposable income starts to grow, they’re going to be just as (if not even more) affiliated to their mobile device.

To capture this audience when they reach their most profitable, retailers need to be creating a mobile-first strategy today, which puts in place the foundations for effectively reaching customers via this ever-growing channel.

Some companies already are; Walmart recently announced the launch of an SMS service, which sends shoppers verbal directions through their smartphone to the item they’re trying to find. They can then text the word ‘chat’ to receive one-to-one customer service.

Others are beginning to incorporate mobile into their outbound marketing strategy. Just this week, Pizza Hut launched a number of ‘smart restaurants’ in mainland China, which uses iBeacon technology to beam coupons, special offers and competitions to patrons’ devices.

But there is one absolutely fundamental component to any mobile-based retail and hospitality strategy, and that’s the network. To connect with customers, customers first must be able to connect – and this means having a robust, secure public Wi-Fi connection.

Free Wi-Fi is still not a universal concept in UK retail, so a huge step forward must be taken by the industry if we want to truly engage with shoppers across the devices that have come to dominate their lives.

Until consumers are able to get online in-store in a frictionless manner, retailers are missing an opportunity to build and strengthen relationships with them. This needs to be addressed as a priority, before Millennials grow up to become the country’s biggest spending group, or the chance to drive mobile revenue could slip through companies’ fingers.

House of Fraser & John Lewis show customer-centric change isn’t just customer-facing

There’s an interesting shift occurring in the UK retail industry at the moment, and it’s deep rooted within leading organisations. A few weeks ago, we saw House of Fraser restructure its senior personnel, and now John Lewis is doing the same.

Of course, changing roles is nothing new – there is always movement at the top of the tree – however, what these two retailers are doing is more significant. John Lewis has created a brand new role – group productivity director – for its retail director Andrew Murphy, and added ‘omnichannel customer journey’ to the job spec of its operations director, Dino Rocos.

House of Fraser has taken this even further, creating a unified customer insight team encompassing its brand, product, CRM and multichannel functions. Moreover, this team will sit at the centre of its business decisions.

While to the consumer’s eye, not much has changed with these reappointments, they mark a potential seismic shift in the retailer/shopper relationship. Though customer-centricity has been a core objective of the industry for some time, many businesses have tried to nurture this from the customer backwards; think iBeacons, self-service kiosks, mobile apps and queue busting technology.

Many of these tools have been incredibly successful, however they only change engagement at a superficial level. Underneath the bells and whistles, there are still fundamental improvements needed within the networks and logistics that power the customer experience.

True change starts from within, and that’s exactly why the likes of John Lewis and House of Fraser are going back to the drawing board and redesigning their infrastructure from the customer OUTwards, rather than backwards.

And they’re not the only ones. The number one reason retailers come to Vodat to upgrade their store communications or managed data network is customer experience; they just can’t match the speed and complexity of today’s consumer interactions and it’s having a detrimental impact on their revenue.

By reinvigorating the people and processes powering their organisations, retailers are laying the foundations for a new form of customer-centric experience. One that supports the ability to wow shoppers at the front-end with the capacity to physically deliver on their promises. This is the magical combination that will increase customer satisfaction, and engender long-term loyalty.