Inside the mind of the modern consumer

Understanding customers is no easy job for retailers today. What consumers want is changing all the time, as is the technology that they rely on as part of their shopping trip. It’s no wonder that many businesses are struggling to keep up!

It doesn’t help that retailers are inundated with headlines that profess the latest insights into consumer habits; which ones can they actually trust? Here, we’ve detailed the most recent retail research that retailers – online and off – should factor into their customer experience strategy.

“They are impatient” – Vodat International

5 minutes; that’s how long a customer will wait for their query to be answered in-store. That doesn’t leave much time for a staff member to gather the information they’re unsure of, before that shopper abandons their journey completely.

How to respond

Ensure that your workforce receives regular training regarding your product offering – especially if new items are added. For an extra helping hand, why not implement tablets in stores so that answers are always at staff’s fingertips?

“They expect personalisation” – iVend Retail

A third of shoppers think they get personalised offers online, but not in-store. Perhaps this is one of the key reasons why ecommerce seems to gaining its sales share of channel.

How to respond

Yes, online has automated capabilities that allow loyal customers to receive information that is specific to them – but there is something the store can do better.  The ability to see, touch and try products cannot be replicated online, and even better, the presence of staff means that shoppers can get even more insight into the products they’re interested in. There’s nothing more personable than face-to-face interaction, so encourage conversation to give staff the opportunity to upsell products that might compliment a customer’s purchase.

“They tap-to-pay” – Visa

The number of contactless transactions made in the UK last year increased by 250%, according to the payments specialist. It’s suggested that this is largely due to the spending limit rise in September, which saw consumers able to pay for goods of up to £30, as opposed to just £20.

How to respond

The speed of the payment method fits the profile of today’s busy, impatient shopper. Therefore, now is definitely the time to ensure that your store not only accepts contactless, but encourages its usage.

You’ll also find that the same NFC technology in contactless terminals works with some mobile payments services, e.g. Apple Pay. As availability widens, consumers will come to expect all retailers to offer the method to them in-store. Those that don’t are likely to be viewed as outdated pretty soon, while those that do will see queue times accelerate and customer satisfaction soar.

Of course, if you’re planning on implementing such technology, you’ll want to make sure that your card payment network security is up-to-scratch. You can find out how to ensure this here.

“They go mobile” – Episerver

Mobile shopping is already playing a huge part in how people are shopping this year; 59% of Brits used their device to purchase items in the January sales.

How to respond

Shopping on a mobile device is meant to provide the ultimate convenience for consumers, allowing them to browse retailers wherever they go. With this in mind, it’s essential that you make your own mobile experience easy – ensure that you’re website is properly optimised, and that the payment process is neither lengthy nor fiddly.

“They click-and-collect” – Atomik

Shoppers might love mobile, but not quite as much as click-and-collect. A recent survey saw it beat mobile as the method that impacted their 2015 shopping experience the most.

How to respond

The role of the store has evolved from being just a sales channel, it now has to deal with a constant flow of click-and-collect orders. As most retailers now offer the service, they need to make sure that it’s the best it can be to stand out from so many others that offer the same. Training staff, implementing dedicated click-and-collect personnel, or adding an interactive kiosk are all ways to better optimise the store for click-and-collect. Of course, with all this extra technology, retailers must invest in a network that’s robust enough to support it.

Have you seen any recent retail statistics that you think offer real value to retailers? Then share them with us on Twitter via @Vodat_Int.

 

What’s in store for stores in 2015? 3 retail game changers

Retail never stays still – if anything, it’s moving faster than ever. This year alone, we’ve seen growing adoption of click and collect and contactless payments, to name two examples. But what will be the major influences changing retailer/consumer relationships in 2015?

In our final blog of 2014, we’re looking towards the year ahead – and predicting what’s in store for retail stores next year. Here are our top 3 most influential trends:

  1. There will be more devices in the store

From mPOS tablets being operated by sales associates, to mobiles being utilised by consumers to showroom, digital touch points will become an even greater part of the store experience. This will place additional strain on retailers’ data networks.

Those who triumph will offer reliable connections for staff and robust complimentary WiFi connections for the customer.

  1. Technology will personalise store shopping

We touched on the store becoming a theatre of dreams in a blog post earlier this year, and this trend will most certainly continue into 2015.

Technology such as near field communication (NFC) and Bluetooth beacons, are already being piloted by major retailers like John Lewis and House of Fraser; this points towards in-store interactivity dominating next year’s marketing and customer service agenda.

  1. Reputations will thrive or dive on payment security

With more consumers than ever using credit and debit cards to pay for goods, data breaches could prove devastating to retailers’ reputations. From June 30th 2015, businesses accepting card payments will need to meet PCI DSS v3 standards.

As a result, the race will be on to upgrade current payment solutions and reduce scope for PCI compliance before legislation comes into force.

For further information about payments security in 2015, visit the Payments Network, our online community for retailers and hospitality vendors.

What are the big payments issues we’ll be talking about in 2015?

It seems only yesterday we were welcoming in the start of 2014, wondering which payment talking points would dominate the agenda during the months ahead. Yet now we’re starting to form our next batch of New Year’s resolutions – and putting a new set of payment predictions together – for 2015.

There are of course still two months remaining this year, and things can change quickly in the world of payments. However, we’ll be given an insight into some of 2015’s hot topics at the upcoming Cartes Secure Connexions event in France, which takes place between 4-6th November.

Digital dominates the programme at Cartes this year, which is no surprise considering the exponential rise of mobile usage within retail. Much of the discussions will be surrounding location technologies such as iBeacons and NFC; it will be interesting to hear the industry’s thoughts not just on how geo-based connectivity will transform consumer relationships, but how it will impact shoppers’ payment preferences.

The future of currency will also be under debate, focusing on cryptocurrencies and mobile wallets. Bitcoin is sure to provoke strong reactions – PayPal founder Peter Thiel recently proclaimed his scepticism towards it – while Apple’s announcement of its first mobile wallet has reignited concerns surrounding ‘tap to pay’ security.

On the subject of protecting customers’ payment information, recent breaches for major US retailers such as Home Depot and Kmart have put the issue of data security as a whole under the spotlight. It’s interesting, though, to note that most of the Cartes sessions focus on rebuilding and maintaining customer relationships, rather than how to minimise the risk of information compromise. This is a subject we have discussed at length in our online community, The Payments Network.

Though we’ll have to wait a few more weeks to see exactly what unfolds for the industry in 2015, the Cartes programme has highlighted one interesting issue regarding the future of payments: we might be reaching new levels of sophistication and digital interactivity, but at the same time we’re still trying to address age-old concerns.