What must BHS do to survive its CVA revival?

BHS’ owners breathed a sigh of relief this week when creditors voted in favour of a Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) that will see rents cut on many of its stores, but this is just one small victory on the road to recovery.

The department store chain’s past has been somewhat chequered in recent history. Loss making for 7 years, BHS was bought by invesment group Retail Acquisitions for just £1 in March 2015, when retail Tycoon Sir Philip Green failed to revive its fortunes.

BHS’ chief executive, Darren Topp, has placed the blame for its latest poor performance squarely at the door of retail property prices, claiming the retailer’s problems are down to cost rather than sales.

The CVA will certainly ease some of this pressure, as 47 stores will have rents slashed by either 50% or 75%, while negotiations will take place to reduce rental on the remaining 40 stores (excluding those held separately by BHS Properties Limited) by 25%.

What’s more important, though, is that Retail Acquisitions use this lifeline to raise the capital needed to reinvigorate the BHS brand, as its lacklustre results are down to much more than rising costs. “The shops are tatty and the clothing lines dowdy,” remarked the Financial Times’ Jonathan Guthrie in his analysis of the situation.

However, Guthrie’s conclusion that “department stores have themselves fallen from fashion with shoppers” couldn’t be further from the truth. BHS has to look no further than John Lewis and House of Fraser – both of which pre-date the 88-year-old chain – to see two examples of similar businesses that have evolved much more successfully.

So, where did BHS go wrong – and what does it need to do in order to put it right? Certainly within omnichannel retail, the business has been caught napping. John Lewis and House of Fraser have put significant investment into their digital strategies, both in terms of online offering and promoting technology-led engagement in the store. House of Fraser has gone mobile-first with its website, while John Lewis’ retail app was recently voted third best in the UK. Both companies have invested heavily in click-and-collect.

In contrast, BHS has been driving down its margins even further with seemingly permanent discount promotions, and trying to diversify into new areas such as foods rather than reinventing its core clothing and homeware range.

Recently, though, there has been light at the end of the tunnel. The convenience food initiative is still in play, but BHS seems to have turned a corner with regards to prioritising what needs to change. 23 stores have already undergone a rebrand, and Topp has vowed to streamline its product range and focus on the brands which resonate with its customers. It’s also implementing an aggressive ecommerce strategy, to increase online shopping’s share of sales from 12% to 20%.

Interestingly, BHS has hired ex-House of Fraser brand marketing director, Tony Holdway, as marketing and creative director. He has already vowed to overturn the company’s lack of brand appeal and investment.

The fact that Holdway has jumped ship from House of Fraser is almost a bigger coup for BHS than the CVA. Having someone who knows how to run department store marketing, 2016 style, will help the retailer to shake off its outdated image and start embracing the omnichannel, multi-touchpoint journey to purchase that hallmarks modern retail.

One thing is for sure; if BHS doesn’t aspire to the relevance and agility of John Lewis and House of Fraser, it’s going to find itself back in the danger zone pretty quickly. And it would be a huge shame to lose one of the High Street’s most recognisable heritage brands.

The secret to successful store expansion

Online retail is no stranger to positive headlines. In fact, it sometimes seems that all we hear about in the industry is the strength of ecommerce.

And it’s these types of stories that have put stores in the spotlight for the wrong reasons. Although 90% of all sales still happen in physical shops, there seems to be far more of a focus on the aspects of bricks-and-mortar that aren’t doing quite so well. For example, in the last few weeks alone, BHS, Greggs and Dixons Carphone have been making headlines regarding store closures.

One of the key reasons that stores close is because they don’t resonate with shoppers; in the interactive, instant world of digital commerce, store layouts and processes can appear outdated. However, this is something that can be amended – and there’s a huge appetite amongst retailers for getting the store right and growing its presence. New research by CBRE has revealed that retail estate expansion still remains high on the agenda, with 83% of retailers adamant that store growth will not be influenced by the rise of ecommerce this year. After all, there is no online substitute for seeing, touching and trying items before purchase.

The benefits of bricks-and-mortar haven’t gone unnoticed by e-tailers. Already this year, we’ve seen their eyes move towards the high streets, with the likes of Missguided announcing its first offline stores. Yes, the business is doing very well trading as it is, but if they want to grow even further, it makes sense to offer a physical experience as an alternative too.

So how can retailers optimise their stores for profit growth – and potential expansion if they get their formula right? For starters, today’s connected consumer is all about convenience and, as we well know, that doesn’t necessarily mean choosing between online or offline retail. Instead, shoppers want to switch between the two at different stages of their journey, and they need to know that retailers will allow them to be flexible in this respect.

Achieving this level of agility means incorporating some of the elements that shoppers love about digital platforms into the store experience. Some retailers are already way ahead of the game, launching concepts that aim to convey the ‘store of the future.’

House of Fraser, for example, recently experimented with shoppable windows, whilst Tommy Hilfiger has brought the runway to the store using virtual reality headsets. These are pretty ambitious of course; the store must focus on perfecting the basics before taking this kind of leap. Investing in more mainstream technology such as mobile POS is one good example of connecting the bricks-and-mortar experience through online functionality.

Another key consideration is the interaction between ecommerce and store activity through click-and-collect. Even though many retailers already offer the service, there are still elements of the process that frustrate customers. Perfecting the ‘collect’ part should now be a major focus for stores, making it a pleasant experience for those finalising their purchase. Enabling speedy payments technology, such as contactless, will be handy here, as well as ensuring the right amount of staff are there to keep the queues running smoothly. Streamlining the click-and-collect element will increase the opportunity to encourage further impulse purchases.

Of course, not all online browsing will take place at home. In an era of smartphone addicts, it’s now habit for consumers to rely on their devices whilst in a store too. Vodat International recently commissioned some research that revealed 54% of shoppers use their smartphones to compare prices in the aisles, 46% look up product information and 44% for personal reasons, such as checking social media. The bottom line is that consumers expect to be able to connect to the web whenever suits them – and that includes within the bricks-and-mortar shopping journey.

It may seem obvious, but there are still retailers that do not invest properly in strong WiFi to encourage this behaviour in controlled circumstances. In fact, 3 in 10 shoppers don’t find the current standard of WiFi unreliable. Retailers with sub-par WiFi are not only at risk of frustrating their customers, they are also losing a valuable opportunity to understand (and react to) their behaviour patterns. Provided they select the right provider, retailers will be able to interact with, influence and capture insight on consumers when they log on to the network.

It’s great to hear that retailers are feeling optimistic about the potential of stores, especially at a time when ecommerce is threatening share of sales channel. Gone is the time where stores and online were two separate things; the future of the store is very much intertwined with digital interaction. If they go about it in the right way, retailers can now harness the power of ecommerce in the physical environment, and use it to boost profitability.

Stay tuned for our new report – Battle of the bandwidths: why customers are won and lost on the strength of retail networks – which will provide even more insights into the connected consumer.

Inside the mind of the modern consumer

Understanding customers is no easy job for retailers today. What consumers want is changing all the time, as is the technology that they rely on as part of their shopping trip. It’s no wonder that many businesses are struggling to keep up!

It doesn’t help that retailers are inundated with headlines that profess the latest insights into consumer habits; which ones can they actually trust? Here, we’ve detailed the most recent retail research that retailers – online and off – should factor into their customer experience strategy.

“They are impatient” – Vodat International

5 minutes; that’s how long a customer will wait for their query to be answered in-store. That doesn’t leave much time for a staff member to gather the information they’re unsure of, before that shopper abandons their journey completely.

How to respond

Ensure that your workforce receives regular training regarding your product offering – especially if new items are added. For an extra helping hand, why not implement tablets in stores so that answers are always at staff’s fingertips?

“They expect personalisation” – iVend Retail

A third of shoppers think they get personalised offers online, but not in-store. Perhaps this is one of the key reasons why ecommerce seems to gaining its sales share of channel.

How to respond

Yes, online has automated capabilities that allow loyal customers to receive information that is specific to them – but there is something the store can do better.  The ability to see, touch and try products cannot be replicated online, and even better, the presence of staff means that shoppers can get even more insight into the products they’re interested in. There’s nothing more personable than face-to-face interaction, so encourage conversation to give staff the opportunity to upsell products that might compliment a customer’s purchase.

“They tap-to-pay” – Visa

The number of contactless transactions made in the UK last year increased by 250%, according to the payments specialist. It’s suggested that this is largely due to the spending limit rise in September, which saw consumers able to pay for goods of up to £30, as opposed to just £20.

How to respond

The speed of the payment method fits the profile of today’s busy, impatient shopper. Therefore, now is definitely the time to ensure that your store not only accepts contactless, but encourages its usage.

You’ll also find that the same NFC technology in contactless terminals works with some mobile payments services, e.g. Apple Pay. As availability widens, consumers will come to expect all retailers to offer the method to them in-store. Those that don’t are likely to be viewed as outdated pretty soon, while those that do will see queue times accelerate and customer satisfaction soar.

Of course, if you’re planning on implementing such technology, you’ll want to make sure that your card payment network security is up-to-scratch. You can find out how to ensure this here.

“They go mobile” – Episerver

Mobile shopping is already playing a huge part in how people are shopping this year; 59% of Brits used their device to purchase items in the January sales.

How to respond

Shopping on a mobile device is meant to provide the ultimate convenience for consumers, allowing them to browse retailers wherever they go. With this in mind, it’s essential that you make your own mobile experience easy – ensure that you’re website is properly optimised, and that the payment process is neither lengthy nor fiddly.

“They click-and-collect” – Atomik

Shoppers might love mobile, but not quite as much as click-and-collect. A recent survey saw it beat mobile as the method that impacted their 2015 shopping experience the most.

How to respond

The role of the store has evolved from being just a sales channel, it now has to deal with a constant flow of click-and-collect orders. As most retailers now offer the service, they need to make sure that it’s the best it can be to stand out from so many others that offer the same. Training staff, implementing dedicated click-and-collect personnel, or adding an interactive kiosk are all ways to better optimise the store for click-and-collect. Of course, with all this extra technology, retailers must invest in a network that’s robust enough to support it.

Have you seen any recent retail statistics that you think offer real value to retailers? Then share them with us on Twitter via @Vodat_Int.

 

Has Marks & Spencer sparked a smarter way to increase loyalty?

Unless you’ve been hiding under a rock, you’ll know that Marks & Spencer has just unveiled its new loyalty scheme, Sparks, to rapturous applause across the retail industry.

Hailed as ‘groundbreaking’ by the retailer, Sparks differentiates itself from traditional applications by rewarding both purchases and non-transactional activities, such as product reviews.

Accumulating large volumes of points will open up access to money-can’t-buy experiences, such as exclusive events and collection previews – which Marks & Spencer believes will foster a two-way relationship with their most loyal customers, tailoring the brand experience.

The retail industry has been quick to praise this new approach to customer retention, and not without reason. Our discount-driven culture has devalued promotional and price based loyalty; consumers now expect a good deal as standard. In fact, many are tired of having to make a purchase altogether to pledge their allegiance.

Instead, loyal customers are building a new role for themselves, in which their brand advocacy becomes part of the retailer’s marketing strategy. Today’s consumers don’t just feel satisfied when they’ve had a good experience – they blog about it, tweet about it, Instagram their new purchase, review the experience online, and so forth (something we discussed in our recent report about how social media can make or break customer relationships).

Smart retailers realise this and are finding ways to reward it.

However, Marks & Spencer isn’t the first. This type of non-transactional incentivisation is already being pushed hard in the hospitality industry. Starbucks, for example, has experienced tremendous success with its mobile app, which gives users custom offers, early access to new products, even enables them to pay at the same time as collecting points.

Even other retailers have forged ahead with experiential offerings for its most loyal customers. Harvey Nichols springs to mind here – the premium department store has made its entire programme mobile-based, using an app to fast track high value customers through to exclusive events and personalised privileges.

What’s seminal about Marks & Spencer’s Sparks, though, is its sphere of influence.

Regardless of the ups and downs it has weathered in recent years, M&S is a stalwart British brand, reflecting British people. Families have shopped there for generations, and trust the retailer to deliver to a certain level of quality. Therefore if Marks & Spencer are offering it, they’ll start expecting other household names to follow suit.

The battle isn’t won yet for M&S, though. Now it needs to integrate Sparks within its offering, to recognise true customer value across all channels. This is easy to do online, but it’s harder work in the store – and customers cannot feel they are being treated as a second class citizen when they choose the bricks-and-mortar route to purchase.

So in conclusion, Marks & Spencer’s loyalty scheme has the potential to ripple across the High Street, redefining how retailers value and reward their customers. But it will only truly hit the nail on the head if it’s part of a joined up omnichannel experience.

Is retail ready for the mobile-obsessed shopper’s rise to power?

123: that’s the number of times the average 17-25 year-old checks their iPhone every single day. To put this into context, that’s 30 times more than 26-35 year-olds, and a whopping 86 times more than those aged 55+, according to the latest Kantar data.

This information is not surprising – we all know the younger generations are glued to their phones most of the time – but it does beg the question as to whether retailers are listening to such statistics?

Right now, it doesn’t matter too much on the whole, because older shoppers are those with the greatest disposable income. Last year, the average 30-49 year-old could enjoy up to £1,400 to spend on goods and services each month, compared to around £100 for the 18-30s.

However, today’s tech-obsessed shoppers are tomorrow’s young professionals, and today’s young professionals are tomorrow’s high flyers. And when their disposable income starts to grow, they’re going to be just as (if not even more) affiliated to their mobile device.

To capture this audience when they reach their most profitable, retailers need to be creating a mobile-first strategy today, which puts in place the foundations for effectively reaching customers via this ever-growing channel.

Some companies already are; Walmart recently announced the launch of an SMS service, which sends shoppers verbal directions through their smartphone to the item they’re trying to find. They can then text the word ‘chat’ to receive one-to-one customer service.

Others are beginning to incorporate mobile into their outbound marketing strategy. Just this week, Pizza Hut launched a number of ‘smart restaurants’ in mainland China, which uses iBeacon technology to beam coupons, special offers and competitions to patrons’ devices.

But there is one absolutely fundamental component to any mobile-based retail and hospitality strategy, and that’s the network. To connect with customers, customers first must be able to connect – and this means having a robust, secure public Wi-Fi connection.

Free Wi-Fi is still not a universal concept in UK retail, so a huge step forward must be taken by the industry if we want to truly engage with shoppers across the devices that have come to dominate their lives.

Until consumers are able to get online in-store in a frictionless manner, retailers are missing an opportunity to build and strengthen relationships with them. This needs to be addressed as a priority, before Millennials grow up to become the country’s biggest spending group, or the chance to drive mobile revenue could slip through companies’ fingers.

Argos is smart to start trading-up customers’ old tech

I wonder how many unused gadgets the average person has lying around their home? The pace of technological change is such that I suspect most households have at least one previous generation smartphone or tablet in a drawer somewhere.

In fact, the UK as a whole has about £1 billion worth of retired tech tucked away, according to electronic equipment recycle firm, Wrap. And Argos has become the first retailer smart enough to capitalise on this opportunity, by teaming up with Wrap and inviting consumers to trade in out-of-date digital items at their stores.

This seems like a win-win scheme; shoppers get Argos vouchers in return, which they can use to get the latest generation gadget, and they don’t have to dispose of the item themselves; the retailer gets additional custom and some positive publicity; Wrap gets lots more lovely devices to reuse or recycle, reducing the electronics industry’s contribution to UK landfill.

It’s surprising that a scheme like this hasn’t been piloted before – at least, not on the scale of what Argos is planning – but I guess this must be down to the financial, logistical and promotional investment needed to make it a success. However, those who haven’t boldly gone down this route may not realise how clever Argos is being, aligning itself with a technology recycling scheme.

Argos has undergone a major strategic overhaul over the last 12-18 months to reposition itself as a digital-first company (including the launch of a digital concept store on London’s Old Street), and this latest move brings customers into its tech-savvy community.

The recycling scheme is sending out a clear signal: ‘because we’re a company on the cutting edge, we know that you crave the latest technology, and we’re going to help you make that upgrade in an environmentally friendly, financially beneficial fashion’.

Not only does this court custom in general, as the exchange of vouchers will encourage shoppers to make their next technology purchase with Argos, it attracts a specific segment that is interested in electronic gadgets.

These are the early adopters, the boundary pushers; the type of customers likely to embrace in-store technologies such as self-service order points, find them of benefit, and return to the store in future because of them.

So Argos is smart to start trading-up customers’ old tech – because this could well be the scheme that unites digital-first shoppers with their technology-led ambitions.

6 stories that redefined retail in the first 6 months of 2015

It’s hard to believe we’re already in July; where has the first 6 months of the year disappeared to?!

As we pass the halfway point of 2015, let’s look at some of the retail stories we could not have predicted on New Year’s Day, and the trends that are likely to shape the months ahead.

  1. The demise and (sort of) rise of Tesco

2014 wasn’t a great year for Tesco – and 2015 didn’t start well either, with the company announcing the biggest ever loss in its 96-year history in April. However, once incoming CEO Dave Lewis got his feet settled under the table, things started to improve for the supermarket chain, which defied analyst predictions to post lower-than-expected sales falls in June.

  1. Cheaper by the dozen

There’s just no stopping shoppers’ appetite for low-budget bargains; in May, the Local Data Company announced that Aldi and Lidl are now opening at least 5 UK stores each week – growing at twice the rate of the Big Four supermarkets – while Iceland and Farmfoods are also rapidly increasing their retail footprint.

Poundland is proving another unstoppable force, entering into talks with regulators to acquire fellow discount brand, 99p Stores.

  1. Apple Pay hits the UK

July is an important month for the UK payments industry, as Apple Pay hits shop floors and restaurant tables for the first time. Though consumer awareness of mobile wallets remains conservative, the fact that major corporations such as Boots, Costa, New Look and Nando’s have signed up to the service, indicates that the industry expects great things in the long run.

Read our blog: there’s a lot more retail & hospitality needs to get right before taking a bite out of Apple Pay.

  1. The £1 takeover

A pound can’t get you much these days: 1.3 Mars Bars, half a bottle of shampoo… an entire retail chain?!

That’s exactly what private consortium Retail Acquisitions paid for BHS in March, as Sir Phillip Green offloaded the struggling retail chain from his Arcadia Group.

Despite its name, Retail Acquisitions has a lack of experience in the sector, and its early plans include heavy-handed measures such as the potential closure of BHS’ flagship store on London’s Oxford Street. Watch this space.

  1. Retail delivery take-Uber

Uber takes the title of 2015’s most controversial company to date, with disgruntled taxi drivers in France and the USA protesting against the service within the last few days. However, it’s not just the travel sector that Uber wants to change; it has reportedly joined forces with the likes of Tiffany and Hugo Boss to pilot a luxury goods home delivery service for designer shoppers.

Over time, Uber’s aim is to combine retail fulfilment and passenger services, to bring down the cost of transporting goods – definitely one story to keep an eye on.

  1. Honey, I shrunk the high street

They say size doesn’t matter, but everything seems to be getting smaller in 2015. Supermarket chains have turned their attention to the c-store market, while another traditional big box retailer – Ikea – has announced its first UK foray into small format stores.

Even larger retail space is being divided and conquered; Asda has teamed up with Decathlon to launch a ‘store within a store’, while Argos will be rolling out a number of collection points within larger Sainsbury’s supermarkets.

Which stories have defined your retail year to date? Tweet us @Vodat_Int with your views.

 

Apple Pay: there’s a lot more retail and hospitality needs to get right before taking a bite

Like most technology vendors, we’ve been eagerly awaiting the formalisation of Apple Pay’s launch in the UK – and paid particular interest to which retailers and hospitality vendors will be first to launch the service.

Boots, Dune, JD Sports and New Look are early retail adopters, while Costa, KFC, Pret A Manger, Nando’s and Wagamama are all flagship Apple Pay candidates on the hospitality side.

Of course, whilst this has novelty value at the moment, there is still a consumer adoption mountain for Apple Pay’s advocates to climb. For starters, the function is only available to Apple Watch, iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus users – those devices equipped with NFC technology – so it will take time for earlier technology users to make an upgrade.

Also, the concept of mobile payments is still very young. Don’t forget, it’s only in the last 18-24 months that we’ve seen contactless take off as a convenient transaction method; and that’s using debit cards, a familiar means of paying for goods.

Speaking of contactless, this brings me to another point. The purpose of these emerging payment technologies is to make life quicker and more convenient for the consumer. Giving them the chance to use a niche payment service like Apple Pay is fair enough, but many retailers and hospitality vendors still haven’t perfected their current transactional offering.

In today’s customer-centric society, getting the basics right cannot be underestimated. Adding new payment channels puts greater strain on stores and hospitality venues – devices, data, networks, staff knowledge, customer service etc. Without a solid foundation to build on, businesses risk adding to a house of cards that could collapse at any second.

One thing we do know is that mobile commerce has increased significantly in importance over the past 12 months, so it’s likely that mobile payments will follow suit. While consumers are coming to terms with using their smartphones as a payment device, retailers and hospitality companies have a prime opportunity to refine their existing transactional technology, ahead of Apple Pay’s widespread launch further down the line.

For more payments insights visit our sister site, The Payments Network.

Is your store ready for the mobile shopper?

Fashion retailers are immersed in one of the most competitive markets out there. With constantly changing trends to keep up with, meeting customer demands has always been difficult to achieve.

Alongside this, retailers now have consumers’ tech-addiction to contend with. As new devices constantly hit the market, shoppers are being presented with alternative ways to browse and pay for goods – with fashion being the first stop it seems!

According to the latest research from the British Retail Consortium, UK consumers are increasingly using their mobile devices to shop online, particularly when it comes to buying clothes. In fact, popularity is soaring, with smartphone searches rising by over 50% since last year.

While this may seem intimidating for bricks-and-mortar stores, there’s no reason why they can’t embrace mobile technology too. It’s very likely that most customers will be carrying a smartphone, so why not see the device as an untapped resource to help boost business?

Many retailers are already doing just that. UK shoe specialist Clarks has noticed the appeal of mobile to today’s shopper, and actually promotes the service to passers-by. Featuring stickers in their shop windows, Clarks urges shoppers to use their devices in-store to browse their entire product range online. This not only caters to consumers’ growing reliance on technology, it encourages them to complete their full journey in the store – even if their desired item might not be there at that time.

Some retailers are taking this one step further, creating mobile apps aimed to enhance the store experience. Ted Baker is a great example of this, finding a way to combine mobile and beacon technology to draw in more shoppers. The retailer’s Westfield White City store recently installed beacons in its mannequins, allowing them to send push notifications to customer smartphones about the displayed items. If the shopper has downloaded the Ted Baker app, they will be able to quickly purchase the clothing directly from the website.

However, before retailers consider launching an in-store mobile strategy, there are some factors to consider. For one, there’s no use advertising mobile services if their website is not mobile optimised. Surprisingly, Barclays recently revealed 70% of UK retailers have admitted they do not have a responsive website or an app in place – which can be very off-putting for a smartphone shopper.

Secondly, retailers must ensure they have a robust Wi-Fi network in place if they are offering mobile facilities in the store. A slow internet service will not only discourage customers from using it in the first place, but will likely open doors to complaints too.

Mobile offers a very lucrative opportunity to build stronger relationships that drive revenue in the store. However, retailers need to get the basics right to create a solid foundation on which to build impressive customer experiences.

How long will it be before cash becomes obsolete?

It seems wild to imagine a world without cash – up there with teleporting to work or going for a week’s trip to the moon. But paying for goods with coins and notes could soon become a thing of the past, if consumers’ appetite for card transactions continues to progress at its current rate.

According to the latest World Payments Report from Capgemini and Royal Bank of Scotland (RBS), card payments are expected to rise by another 10% this year, reaching 366 billion transactions worldwide. This won’t surprise the developed world, but much of the gains being made currently are in underdeveloped non-cash markets such as China.

The convergence of technology is also supporting plastic’s progress; Capgemini predicts mobile payments will grow by 60.8% in 2015, taking over online transactions as the most popular transaction format. New entries into the m-payment market such as Apple Pay and the enhancement of more established services such as Google Wallet will only accelerate this change, provided they offer a secure, user-friendly experience.

And herein lies the crux of this payment shift: as customers move from cash to card, the responsibility for safeguarding their details moves to the retailer. If shoppers are pickpocketed, they only have the perpetrator to blame; if their card details are breached, the retailer’s payments processing software comes under fire.

Naturally, industry bodies such as the PCI Security Standards Council are introducing new security standards to protect consumer data – just look at Target and Home Depot in the US to see the potential scale of payment information breaches – but in many cases, this has led to payments providers developing convoluted solutions that are beyond the comprehension of many businesses.

What retailers need right now is to find the most robust and straightforward way to encrypt and protect customer information. Whilst meeting the highest security standards before they are mandated might not be top on the list of priorities, card payments are an unstoppable force – and could quickly stop working in retailers’ favour should their systems be hacked.

As the saying goes, it’s better to be safe than sorry.