Make better communication your store’s New Year’s resolution

There’s no doubt that online retail has had its fair share of flattering headlines this year. Hailed as the speediest, most convenient way to shop, it’s getting harder for bricks-and-mortar to compete.

However, there is something that the store can triumph in – and that’s personal service. While it may be easy to drop a few products into an online basket, the advice and expertise of knowledgeable in-store staff is something that can’t be matched.

Yet, it seems that 2015 may not have been the store’s finest hour. Our own research showed that there’s still much work to do to perfect the in-store experience:

  • 37% of shoppers hate receiving inconsistent answers from staff
  • 30% of consumers have abandoned a purchase because staff couldn’t answer their question
  • 5 minutes is the maximum time customers will wait for a query to be answered before leaving the store

That leaves retailers with a very short window of time to wow the shopper. If they don’t do just that, they risk losing a once loyal customer – one who will no doubt share their negative experience with family and friends.

However, with a New Year comes a new chance to change bad habits. So why not make 2016 the year to perfect your in-store service? It all starts with giving your staff the tools to succeed:

Invest in training

60% of customers believe knowledgeable staff deliver better customer service. Yet, with changing layouts, new products and time-sensitive offers to contend with, it’s no wonder that your workforce may be left confused. Communication is key here; ensure each member of staff is briefed at the start of their shift, alerting them to anything that may have changed since they were last there.

Implement tablets

21% of shoppers want sales associates to be given point of sale technology. And, it’s a request that will make life a lot easier for your staff. Allowing them to walk the floor with a tablet in hand, ensures they will always be ready for that tricky customer question. They’ll be able to check things such as product information and stock availability at the touch of a button, before finalising the purchase with a speedy payment.

Empower customers

22% of consumers would like to see more digital information points in store. There are a number of reasons why your staff might be unavailable for customer queries – whether the queue is too long or they’re locating an order, for example. The point is, sometimes a shortage of sales associates to give a helping hand is out of your control. Therefore, it’s important to ensure that shoppers can help themselves if need be. In-store kiosks are idea, as it presents shoppers with an alternative information source when a staff member isn’t free.

Competing with the fast-growing world of ecommerce is no easy job for stores, certainly if they don’t have the right toolkit to support them. And, of course, implementing the above suggestions will help get 2016 off to a promising start – but without a reliable WiFi connection, your New Year’s resolution for a better store experience will soon be broken.

For more information about successful in-store communication, read our report – ‘Why retailers and customers are becoming disconnected by the store network.’

15 stories that defined retail in 2015

It hardly seems like five minutes since the January sales were underway, yet already we’ve reached the end of the year – and what a year it’s been!

Following on from our 6 stories that redefined retail in the first six months of 2015, here are 15 unpredictable tales that have shaken the industry across the entire year.

In no particular order…

  1. House of Fraser undergoes a customer-centric restructure

It’s already been predicted that 2016 will be the year in which omnichannel evolution results in infrastructural change, and House of Fraser is leading the way. In July, the department store chain announced a customer-centric revamp of its business model, in which its CRM, product and multichannel functions work together around shopper needs.

  1. Amazon goes Prime-tastic in the UK

If Black Friday and Cyber Monday weren’t enough, Amazon launched its own flash sale – Prime Day – in the summer. The inaugural event was hailed a global success, generating a 93% increase in Year-on-Year sales.

Read our blog: Amazon’s Prime Day highlights the gap between online and in-store promotions

  1. Argos ups its delivery game

Fulfilment has been a hotly contest battleground throughout 2015, and Argos put its stake in the ground during October with the launch of a UK same day delivery service, 7 days a week.

This went hand-in-hand with a reinvigorated click-and-collect offering, promising in store collection in less than 60 seconds.

  1. Marks & Spencer puts the Spark back into its loyalty scheme

It’s been a turbulent couple of years for Marks & Spencer, but its revamped loyalty scheme – released in October – may engender greater customer advocacy, by incentivising shoppers for non-transactional activities.

Read our blog: Has Marks & Spencer sparked a smarter way to increase loyalty?

  1. Littlewoods waves goodbye to its catalogue

For many consumers, the Littlewoods catalogue has been a retail institution throughout their lives. However, after 80 years – and earlier promises that it would remain a trading channel – the retailer decided to scrap its catalogue and focus on its online offering.

  1. HMV rises from the ashes

If you’d been asked two years ago to predict which retailer would be the biggest physical retailer of music in the UK in 2015, the administration-bound HMV would have been a rank outsider.

However, a renewed customer-focus strategy, better processes for dealing with peak trading promotions than its rivals, and a resurgence in the appeal of vinyl have all contributed to HMV’s fortunes flourishing once more.

  1. Lush inhales the sweet smell of success

Cosmetics brand Lush deposed insurance firm First Direct as the UK’s best brand for customer experience in 2015, according to KPMG Nunwood rankings. KMPG remarked that the brand’s imparting of product knowledge has been essential to its success, with several other top 10 retailers combining content and commerce to enhance the customer experience.

  1. Wet weather dampens summer sales

The UK experienced its worst retail sales since November 2008 in August this year, with unseasonably damp weather contributing to poor performance on the high street. Online sales did increase during the summer, but at some of the slowest rates on record.

  1. John Lewis starts charging for click-and-collect

Given that most of the retail industry is incentivising customers to collect in store with a free despatch service, an eyebrow or two was raised when John Lewis decided to start charging for click-and-collect orders under £30.

The retailer reasoned that fewer than 1 in 5 shoppers currently make click-and-collect purchases under £30, and it needs a more sustainable model for managing store-based fulfilment costs.

  1. River Island lets customers click and not collect

Continuing the click-and-collect theme, River Island evolved its offering in a different direction during November, pioneering a ‘click and don’t collect’ theme in partnership with Shutl.

The service uses Shutl’s on demand delivery platform to re-route in-store collection orders for home delivery, in order to give customers greater control over their last mile experience.

  1. John Lewis breaks the internet…but Sainsbury’s wins the Christmas ad war

When John Lewis released its Man on the Moon festive advert in November it was viewed so many times that YouTube’s counter froze for several hours. However, the department store chain was trumped by Sainsbury’s, which was voted best Christmas ad by Opinium Research for its tale of Mog the Cat.

  1. Black Friday falls flat on the High Street

The scrums in the aisles that were synonymous with Black Friday 2014 were not repeated this year, as the post-thanksgiving promotion was heavily weighted online. Retail footfall in stores and shopping centres was down 4.05% on Black Friday itself, while ecommerce saw a huge spike in activity that continued right through to Cyber Monday.

  1. The Kurt Geiger shoe fits another foot

They say a change is as good as rest, but when Kurt Geiger was acquired by private equity group Cinven in December, it marked the shoe designer’s third owner in just four years.

Cinven acquired Kurt Geiger for £245million. The company is known for longer-term investments – five years or more – so this could be the start of a new, consistent chapter for the brand.

  1. Customers get cross about connectivity

Poor in-store communications were revealed as a significant cost to customer relationships in a Vodat study published in August. Our survey found that a third of consumers have abandoned a purchase because they couldn’t get the information they needed prior to purchase, while 4 in 10 have left a store and sought the item elsewhere.

Download our report: why retailers and customers are becoming disconnected by the store network

  1. Despite tribulations, retailers end 2015 cautiously confident

It’s not been an easy journey for the retail industry over the past 12 months, but many are hopeful of a strong showing in 2016.

Improving economic sentiment and steady Christmas sales point to positive growth in the New Year, with major cultural events such as the Rio Olympic Games and European Football Championships set to keep shoppers happy – and spending – into the summer months.